LizziePelz

  • Local Expert 7,256 points
  • Reviews 26
  • Questions 0
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Reviews

4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 4/5
  • Clean & Green 5/5
  • Pest Free 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 3/5
  • Eating Out 3/5
  • Nightlife 1/5
  • Parks & Recreation 5/5
  • Shopping Options 2/5
  • Gym & Fitness 2/5
  • Internet Access 3/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Parking 3/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Public Transport 4/5
  • Medical Facilities 4/5
Just now

"Small Town Vibe in Southern Minneapolis"

One of the many southern Minneapolis neighborhoods that developed thanks to the street car, Morris Park is a little slice of heaven that is close to numerous important spots within the city. The light rail has taken the place of the street car and residents can easily travel to downtown without having to run into rush hour traffic found along the highways. The Crosstown Highway passes through the lower half of the neighborhood and the Minneapolis- St. Paul International Airport is close enough to sneeze on. This means residents have to deal with the noise of over passing airplanes. Morris Park is also home to the VA Medical Center, which is well known for it excellence in orthopedic medicine.

Those that live in Morris Park are close to all the green space they could ever want. The actual Morris Park is located in the center of the neighborhood and has the Morris Park School and Hiawatha Leadership Academy next to it. Lake Nokomis is a little less than a mile to the west and the Minnehaha Off-Leash Recreation Area to the east provides a place for dogs to roam free along the river banks. Minnehaha Park and Fort Snelling Gold Course are also nearby. This small town feel of Morris Park is further emphasized by the quaint local shops and cafes. Add affordable prices for the homes and Morris Park is the perfect town within a city.
Pros
  • Close to airport
  • Close to off-leash park
  • low housing prices
  • safe - little crime
Cons
  • far from downtown
Recommended for
  • Tourists
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 4/5
  • Clean & Green 5/5
  • Pest Free 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 3/5
  • Eating Out 3/5
  • Nightlife 1/5
  • Parks & Recreation 5/5
  • Shopping Options 2/5
  • Gym & Fitness 2/5
  • Internet Access 3/5
  • Lack of Traffic 2/5
  • Parking 2/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Public Transport 5/5
  • Medical Facilities 2/5
Just now

"A Nature Paradise"

The name Minnehaha is often assumed to have a humorous connotation behind it, and such an assumption would be correct. Minnehaha is the Ojibwe word for "laughing waters." Minnehaha Creek reaches its final destination in this neighborhood and forms the 53 foot Minnehaha Falls. Hiawatha Ave. runs right next to this waterfall and along Minnehaha Park where the greenery touches the Mississippi River. This community of water and green is truly a sight to behold. This is not only a popular place to live, but it is a frequented vacation day spot for people from all around Minneapolis. The park and river banks host many events throughout the year and are filled with spectators during the spring and summer months.

Minnehaha has many properties from which to choose, most of which are brick structures as well as many environmentally friendly homes that have been developing so as to preserve the natural integrity of the neighborhood. This southern Minneapolis community has access to downtown via Hiawatha Ave. and is just across Highway 62 from the Minneapolis- St. Paul International Airport. Just down the road are other larger regional parks and wetlands into which the Mississippi River feeds. Minnehaha is truly the outdoors-man's dream come true.
Pros
  • By numerous bodies of water
  • Beautiful parks
  • Close to the airport
Cons
  • A little far from downtown
  • Tons of traffic during the wamrer months
Recommended for
  • Tourists
  • Country Lovers
  • Trendy & Stylish
3/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 3/5
  • Clean & Green 3/5
  • Pest Free 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 3/5
  • Eating Out 4/5
  • Nightlife 3/5
  • Parks & Recreation 3/5
  • Shopping Options 4/5
  • Gym & Fitness 3/5
  • Internet Access 4/5
  • Lack of Traffic 4/5
  • Parking 2/5
  • Cost of Living 4/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Public Transport 5/5
  • Medical Facilities 3/5
Just now

"Affordable Living in the Shadow of Industry"

Marshall Terrace is located in northern Minneapolis where industry is king. Dozens of railroad tracks pass through the neighborhood and only about a quarter of the land area has been set aside for residential spaces. This sort of landscaping has made homes in the area affordable, with few being listed for more than $135,000 and rent prices rarely exceeding $650 per month. Properties that were built during the 1940's and 1950's, but a few small apartment buildings are also located here. Homes closer to the river have the advantage of being on tree-lined streets, which helps to distract from the cold industrial backdrop on the eastern edge of the neighborhood.

Residents in Marshall Terrace do have access to some public green space at Marshall Terrace Park where fields, basketball courts and a swimming pool offer many forms of physical activity. Anyone can take a bike ride to the more trendy parts of Minneapolis with Bottineau and Beltrami just downriver. The trail along the river offers a very visually pleasing ride to downtown where residents can access additional dining spots and nightlife. Marshall Terrace is an affordable, safe place to live close to downtown, but one has to get used to the noise of the nearby trains.
Pros
  • Affordable housing
  • Next to the river
  • close to downtown
Cons
  • Noise from rail yards
  • industry
Recommended for
  • Trendy & Stylish
2/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 3/5
  • Clean & Green 3/5
  • Pest Free 2/5
  • Peace & Quiet 3/5
  • Eating Out 3/5
  • Nightlife 3/5
  • Parks & Recreation 3/5
  • Shopping Options 3/5
  • Gym & Fitness 3/5
  • Internet Access 3/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Parking 4/5
  • Cost of Living 4/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 2/5
  • Public Transport 4/5
  • Medical Facilities 2/5
Just now

"Much Room For Improvement"

Jordan is a northern Minneapolis neighborhood that is undergoing both physical and social renovation. The community is notorious for being an area of town struck by crime and poverty, but there are local efforts to revitalize Jordan. Numerous tasks forces led by community members have been working to clean the streets, watch for suspicious activity and even plant a community garden. Jordan is a good spot for those looking to make a extreme impact within their community.

The cheap real estate prices are what keep attracting new residents, with few houses selling for more than $130,000. Those looking for entertainment or more dining options can easily travel to downtown Minneapolis via I-94 or Emerson Ave. N., which turns into N. 7th St. going southbound. Those who do not have their own vehicle can go in and out of Jordan by using the public bus system that extends throughout the metropolitan area. The one green patch within the neighborhood is Jordan Park, which offers a trail and a basketball court. Jordan outranks other communities in the realm of prices in accordance with location, but the high crime rate makes some people uneasy.
Pros
  • Affordable housing
  • Close to downtown
  • residents who are working to improve neighborhood
Cons
  • crime
Recommended for
  • Trendy & Stylish
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 3/5
  • Clean & Green 4/5
  • Pest Free 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 3/5
  • Eating Out 2/5
  • Nightlife 2/5
  • Parks & Recreation 4/5
  • Shopping Options 2/5
  • Gym & Fitness 3/5
  • Internet Access 3/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Parking 3/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 4/5
  • Public Transport 5/5
  • Medical Facilities 3/5
Just now

"Between the Light Rail and the River"

Howe is a residential neighborhood within southern Minneapolis. The community is bordered by the Mississippi River to the east and Hiawatha Ave. to the west. Many of the homes were remodeled during the 80's and are now listed at mid-range prices at around $175,000. a few properties that are for rent seldom cost more than $700 per month. Of course as homes get closer to the river, the prices clime higher. Even then, the costs for these properties are extremely reasonable for being so close to the river and to downtown.

The main selling point for Howe is the local scenery dotted with green patches and waterfalls, with which pedestrian trails take full advantage. The neighborhood has little to offer in dining and shopping, but resident here prefer to keep such spots out for the sake of preserving the natural beauty of their surroundings rather than congest the streets with too many commercial spaces. Those who need those amenities, though, are just a hop and a skip form downtown and other business friendly communities with Hiawatha and Minnehaha Avenues. Howe School ad Dowling Elementary School are both close to the river, as is the Fairview Hiawatha Clinic.
Pros
  • Remodeled homes
  • Next to the river
  • Affordable housing
Cons
  • not a lot of retail
Recommended for
  • Tourists
2/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 3/5
  • Clean & Green 3/5
  • Pest Free 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 2/5
  • Eating Out 2/5
  • Nightlife 2/5
  • Parks & Recreation 3/5
  • Shopping Options 2/5
  • Gym & Fitness 2/5
  • Internet Access 3/5
  • Lack of Traffic 4/5
  • Parking 4/5
  • Cost of Living 4/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Public Transport 3/5
  • Medical Facilities 2/5
Just now

"Cheap Housing in a Hard Hit Community"

An abundance of foreclosures have left many properties vacant at very affordable sale and rental prices. This northern Minneapolis neighborhood is next to the Mississippi River and provides quick access to other parts of the metropolitan area via I-94. Fairview Park offers some outdoor recreation and is located at the very center of the community. This area is close to the Warehouse District and its smaller neighborhoods located across the Mississippi as well as North Loop. Hawthorne has very few dining, retail and entertainment spots, but residents only have to travel less than a mile to downtown for everything they could need.

The Hawthorne neighborhood is a work in progress since hard economic times have made it a place of crime and poverty. There are efforts, however, to rebuild the community into an affordable and enjoyable place to live. Hawthorne is a wise investment for those who want to spend little money to buy a house and then have the property value increase over time as the neighborhood undergoes revitalization. Several local businesses dot the streets, but Hawthorne is mainly a residential area. Those looking to buy or rent their first house or those who simply wish to pinch pennies have numerous options with all the properties that are still vacant within this community. Residents should be weary of the occasional suspicious activity.
Pros
  • Affordable housing
  • Close to downtown
  • Revitalization
Cons
  • High crime and poverty
  • Few retail spots
Recommended for
  • Trendy & Stylish
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 4/5
  • Clean & Green 5/5
  • Pest Free 4/5
  • Peace & Quiet 3/5
  • Eating Out 4/5
  • Nightlife 2/5
  • Parks & Recreation 5/5
  • Shopping Options 4/5
  • Gym & Fitness 3/5
  • Internet Access 4/5
  • Lack of Traffic 2/5
  • Parking 2/5
  • Cost of Living 2/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Public Transport 3/5
  • Medical Facilities 2/5
Just now

"Urban Life Next to the Lake"

Located in southern Minneapolis, Diamond Lake is situated within the corner of I-35W and Highway 62. The community gets its name from, of course, Diamond Lake which is connected to both Todd and Pearl Lake Parks. The neighborhood is close enough for a short commute to downtown, but far enough south for the the non-invasive feel of suburbia. There are several businesses located along Chicago Ave. S. and E. 54th St. takes residents and visitors from Pearl Lake Park to Lake Nokomis, providing endless options for outdoor recreation.

Diamond Lake, though, is not for the low of moderate incomes since the majority of homes are listed at around $250,000. Renting does not provide a cheaper option in a community tat caters to home owners, but this is to be expected for any of the lakeside neighborhoods. In a city that is full of prewar homes, Diamond Lake mostly consists of larger houses that were built during the 1940's and 1950's. This are of Minneapolis is beautiful and functional place to live, but exclusively for those with larger paychecks.
Pros
  • Reatil and dining spots
  • Lake side properties
Cons
  • High traffic
  • Expensive real estate
Recommended for
  • Tourists
  • Trendy & Stylish
3/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 4/5
  • Clean & Green 5/5
  • Pest Free 4/5
  • Peace & Quiet 3/5
  • Eating Out 3/5
  • Nightlife 2/5
  • Parks & Recreation 4/5
  • Shopping Options 3/5
  • Gym & Fitness 3/5
  • Internet Access 4/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Parking 4/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Public Transport 4/5
  • Medical Facilities 2/5
Just now

"History, Beauty and Water"

Those who live in Cooper have the luxury of being just steps away from the Mississippi River and just being downriver from downtown Minneapolis. The neighborhood was named after the historically acclaimed author, James Fenimore Cooper, and the streets maintain a historic appeal with its many homes that predate World War II. Those wishing to live in Cooper would be most comfortable with a relatively high income since a great number houses are priced just under or just over $200,000 and rent is seldom below $750 per month.

The majority of historic homes are modest in size, with one or two bedrooms. E. Lake St. is where the majority of businesses are located and it later turns into Marshall Ave. after crossing the river. There are no public schools in the Cooper community, but there is a private education option with Minnehaha Academy, which is set on the river banks. The local population, which consists of various age groups, with very few college students, enjoy having access to numerous riverside parks and easy access to downtown via W. River Parkway.
Pros
  • Affordable homes
  • Beautiful historic neighborhood
  • Next to the river
Cons
  • No public schools
Recommended for
  • Trendy & Stylish
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 4/5
  • Clean & Green 3/5
  • Pest Free 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 3/5
  • Eating Out 5/5
  • Nightlife 5/5
  • Parks & Recreation 3/5
  • Shopping Options 5/5
  • Gym & Fitness 4/5
  • Internet Access 5/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Parking 2/5
  • Cost of Living 4/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Public Transport 5/5
  • Medical Facilities 4/5
Just now

"The International Face of Minneapolis"

Located on the opposite side of the river of the University of Minnesota and sandwiched between I-94 and I-35W, Cedar Riverside is the most ethnically and culturally diverse community in the city. Almost half of the residents are foreign born and the mix of different architectures reflects the diversity in the population. The neighborhood is home to the fine art facilities of the University of Minnesota as well as the Augsburg College. The eateries and shops in the immediate area do not have counterparts anywhere else in the city and they offer a look into Minneapolis's international population.

Those looking to quench their thirst are never short of options and can mosey on over to the Hard Times Cafe, the Acadia Cafe or the Nomad World Pub. The artistically inclined can view art and shows on campus or within more low maintenance spaces such as the Mixed Blood Theater or the Cedar Cultural Center. The housing options are pretty much limited to apartments and to renters, but they tend to come at very affordable prices. It can be difficult, however, to find vacant properties during the fall and spring semesters when many students are wanting to live just off of campus. The main downside of Cedar Riverside is the frequent crime, mostly consisting of theft and burglary. Hence residents would do well to have bolt locks on their doors.
Pros
  • Diverse population
  • Tons of dining, shops and bars
  • Right next to downtown and university campuses
Cons
  • Higher crime rate
  • Crowded
Recommended for
  • Tourists
  • Trendy & Stylish
2/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 1/5
  • Clean & Green 2/5
  • Pest Free 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 1/5
  • Eating Out 2/5
  • Nightlife 2/5
  • Parks & Recreation 2/5
  • Shopping Options 1/5
  • Gym & Fitness 2/5
  • Internet Access 3/5
  • Lack of Traffic 2/5
  • Parking 3/5
  • Cost of Living 4/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Public Transport 4/5
  • Medical Facilities 2/5
Just now

"Concrete Jungle"

The name of this neighborhood gives it all away. Camden Industrial Area is in fact a long strip of industry warehouses along I-94 that is separated from the river ad highway by a high concrete wall. Though maps will show this community along some green, there is little that is indeed green or visually appealing about this cement jungle. The Camden Industrial Area, though, is of great importance to the city of Minneapolis. Major local manufacturers create their products and provide their services here just across the railroad track from Webber Park, which is the location of the Minneapolis City Hall and Courthouse.

Those who live in the immediate area more often than not also work in one of the warehouses, and pay near nothing to do so. One will find only small apartment buildings of modest rows of low budget town homes that come with cheap rent and very rarely sell for more than $120,000. The reason behind those prices is that very few actually want to live here. Yes, it is extremely close to downtown, but anyone who needs extended periods of shut eye will not get it here with the noise of the freeway and the surrounding manufacturers, as well as the railroads that are on both sides of the river and within hearing range of Camden Industrial Area. For those that are employees of one of the manufacturers, however, there is not a more convenient living situation.
Pros
  • Close to downtown
  • Dirt cheap rent
Cons
  • Very noise
  • By railroad tracks
  • All concrete
2/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 2/5
  • Clean & Green 2/5
  • Pest Free 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 1/5
  • Eating Out 2/5
  • Nightlife 1/5
  • Parks & Recreation 2/5
  • Shopping Options 1/5
  • Gym & Fitness 2/5
  • Internet Access 3/5
  • Lack of Traffic 4/5
  • Parking 4/5
  • Cost of Living 5/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 4/5
  • Public Transport 3/5
  • Medical Facilities 1/5
Just now

"Getting a New Face"

Sumner-Glenwood, more recently referred to as Heritage Park, is a work in progress. This means dirt cheap housing in a neighborhood that is only six blocks west of downtown Minneapolis. Several governing and nonprofit agencies in the city have collaborated to tear down many degraded properties and give this formerly undesirable and small community a new face, though that face has yet to become fully attractive. The landscape on the northern side of the Olson Memorial Highway can best be described as depressing. No matter where one is, there is always a construction site and/or a freeway in view.

Though the new properties are selling or renting at very affordable rates, little else can be offered by the neighborhood in the meantime. One would have to walk under I-94 for any dining, shopping or nightlife spots. Some may argue that Sumner Field can offer outdoor recreation, but the park is nothing but a small patch of grass amidst a sea of concrete with a pathway that looks to be the equivalent of only a tenth of a mile. Sumner-Glenwood is basically cookie cutter apartment in front of more cookie cutter apartments surrounded by construction supplies backed by a freeway. Also, anyone who leaves their valuables in plain site within their vehicle is sure to have them stolen. Though this is not a visually pleasant neighborhood, its convenient location cannot be ignored. Someone on almost any income can live here and only as to walk several blocks to escape the bare bone landscape.
Pros
  • Dirt cheap rent
  • Next to downtown
Cons
  • Construction
  • Nothing but apartments
  • Noise of the freeway
Recommended for
  • Trendy & Stylish
3/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 3/5
  • Clean & Green 4/5
  • Pest Free 4/5
  • Peace & Quiet 4/5
  • Eating Out 3/5
  • Nightlife 3/5
  • Parks & Recreation 3/5
  • Shopping Options 3/5
  • Gym & Fitness 3/5
  • Internet Access 4/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Parking 4/5
  • Cost of Living 5/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 4/5
  • Public Transport 4/5
  • Medical Facilities 3/5
Just now

"Historic Houses at Historically Low Prices"

Bancroft contains one of the oldest public school structures in Minneapolis, which is the location for Bancroft Elementary School. Located in the southern portion of the city, residents here have easy access to downtown via I-35W. Bancroft is a little off the beaten path of the more central neighborhoods, requiring a car or a long walk/ bike ride/ bus ride, but it has one advantage over other communities; affordable historic homes. Seldom priced at above $160,000, the majority of houses in this community were built before World War II, exhibiting a collective charm that is hard to find elsewhere in the metropolitan area.

38th Street, especially where it intersects Bloomington Ave., is where the majority of restaurants and shops are located, even though they are few in number. Residents looking for a few more options, however, can easily walk several blocks north through Powderhorn and into Phillips where more eating spots and shops await their business. Bancroft is a suitable place for recent graduates and young professionals that are looking to pinch a few pennies wile also being able to live in quality housing. A few apartment buildings exist, but the rental prices tend to be more than what the spaces are worth. The crime rate, when compared to other Minneapolis neighborhoods, is at a middle ground, but most incidents are theft related and seldom violent.
Pros
  • Beautiful houses
  • Low sale and rental prices
  • Close to I-35W
Cons
  • Some crime
  • Limited dining and shopping
Recommended for
  • Trendy & Stylish
3/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 4/5
  • Clean & Green 4/5
  • Pest Free 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 2/5
  • Eating Out 5/5
  • Nightlife 5/5
  • Parks & Recreation 3/5
  • Shopping Options 5/5
  • Gym & Fitness 4/5
  • Internet Access 5/5
  • Lack of Traffic 1/5
  • Parking 1/5
  • Cost of Living 4/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Public Transport 5/5
  • Medical Facilities 4/5
Just now

"The University and its Dorms"

The University of Texas neighborhood is pretty much the sum of its name. It is the campus, which includes its dorms. Living here is pretty much impossible and to be avoided if you are not a student. During and outside of the rush hour, Guadalupe and Martin Luther King Jr. Blvd. become congested with traffic and the tons of student pedestrians that do not follow the crosswalk laws do not help the situation. The Drag is along Guadalupe and contains many shops, stores bars, restaurants and music venues. Some local favorites include Hole in the Wall, Kerby Lane Cafe and the Mellow Mushroom. Don't bother bringing your car here as there is no place to park.

Getting a room in the dorms is hard even for enrolled students as there is not enough on campus space for all 50,000 or so students. Many have to get onto a waiting list and if they have no luck they have to look elsewhere in the surrounding neighborhoods. Along MLK is the Blanton Museum of Art, Austin largest museum, which has an impressive permanent collection and hosts some truly amazing exhibits. The Bob Bullock State History Museum across the street has an IMAX theater that attracts residents from all over the city and the Mike Meyers Stadium hosts football games that draw crowds of up to 50,000 people. Safe to say, the University of Texas community is a student's world.
Pros
  • Walking distance to everything
  • Unique restaurants and shops
  • Wonderful public transportation
Cons
  • Good only fo students
  • Practically no parking
3/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 3/5
  • Clean & Green 3/5
  • Pest Free 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 2/5
  • Eating Out 3/5
  • Nightlife 2/5
  • Parks & Recreation 3/5
  • Shopping Options 3/5
  • Gym & Fitness 3/5
  • Internet Access 3/5
  • Lack of Traffic 2/5
  • Parking 3/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 2/5
  • Public Transport 4/5
  • Medical Facilities 2/5
Just now

"Cheap, By the River and a Little Boring"

Riverdale, more commonly known as Riverside, is named so because it it right below the river, which is a major draw for people in addition to the cheap rent. This neighborhood, however, lacks the allure that so man y other Austin communities have and the streets are concrete jungles that have the typical cash advance booths and liquor stores. This community has a less than favorable reputation as some suspicious characters are often spotted on the main streets, but it does not reach the level of sketchiness that Montopolis does. It is simply advised that you watch you back every so often if you are walking down E. Riverside Dr. at night.

Like its neighboring Pleasant Valley, Riverdale is being rebuilt and apartment complexes are shooting up at an incredible speed. These are targeted towards young professionals and university students as the University of Texas has a shuttle that stops by many of these apartments. Those who want to enjoy Austin nightlife have to I-35 which will take them to the Travis Heights and South Congress areas as well as a direct route to Downtown. Being right next to the river and a few parks makes enjoying Austin's outdoors easy and the cheap rental prices make being in such a location a near steal. In hindsight, a person could do better, but he or she could also do a lot worse in choosing a neighborhood in which to live. They just have to constantly step out of the area to have some fun.
Pros
  • Right below the river
  • Cheap rent
  • Close to SoCo
Cons
  • A little shady
  • Apartments only
  • No nightlife
Recommended for
  • Trendy & Stylish
3/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 3/5
  • Clean & Green 3/5
  • Pest Free 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 3/5
  • Eating Out 2/5
  • Nightlife 2/5
  • Parks & Recreation 4/5
  • Shopping Options 2/5
  • Gym & Fitness 3/5
  • Internet Access 4/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Parking 3/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Public Transport 4/5
  • Medical Facilities 2/5
Just now

"Apartment and Condo Mecca"

Pleasant Valley has undergone some very rapid revitalization and as a result many cookie cutter apartment complexes and cheap high rise condos have been popping up all over the place. Due to the low rent prices, many University of Texas students are choosing to live here and take the university shuttle that goes through every day. The neighborhood still suffers a stigma for being right next to Montopolis, which is one of the sketchiest and most undesirable areas in the city, but Pleasant Valley is really making a name for itself; a sort of work in progress. Due to the northern half being Roy G. Guerrero Park, the geographical area of this neighborhood is quite large in comparison to most.

Since it is a community on the rise, there are few restaurants, bars and shopping centers within the immediate area, so residents have to mosey over to adjacent communities to get the thins they need. Those who live here can take E. Riverside to the South Congress area and Lady Bird lake or they can take S. Pleasant Valley Rd. into the more interesting east side neighborhoods, hence location is a main advantage to living in Pleasant Valley. Lakeshore and Guerrero Parks are underrated green areas, so they do not suffer from having too large crowds like Zilker Park. Do not expect to find any houses in the area, as new complexes are still being build in vacant land plots. Should you want cheap rent in a developing neighborhood and don't mind traveling a half mile or so to go to hot spots, then Pleasant Valley would not be a bad choice for you.
Pros
  • Cheap real estate
  • Close to Lady Bird Lake
  • Shuttles
Cons
  • No houses
  • No nightlife
  • Far from UT
Recommended for
  • Trendy & Stylish
3/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 3/5
  • Clean & Green 3/5
  • Pest Free 4/5
  • Peace & Quiet 3/5
  • Eating Out 4/5
  • Nightlife 4/5
  • Parks & Recreation 3/5
  • Shopping Options 4/5
  • Gym & Fitness 2/5
  • Internet Access 4/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Parking 3/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Public Transport 3/5
  • Medical Facilities 4/5
Just now

"Luxury in Northern Austin"

Who knew that there could be just high class this far north within the Austin metropolitan area? Of course this is a level of standard sophistication that can be found in any other major city like Dallas and it lacks the initial weird that makes the city of Austin such an attraction in the first place. This is a getaway for those who love the rich urban life, but cannot quite take the energetic high that the central Austin neighborhoods put into anyone that walks through them. The Domain, which is along Hwy 1 is a center filled with upscale shops and restaurants as well as high rise apartments and condos.

There are few actual houses in this neighborhood, but plenty of large apartments that exceed the size of many of Austin's regular single story abodes. You will find some level of peace and quiet and some level of nightlife activity, but there are no dive bars and no live music venues in which to enjoy the unique Austin sound. An accurate description to give North Burnet would be an urban generic as for places that cost so much they offer nothing truly special. You will see no one moseying over here during South by Southwest or reminiscing about attending Eeyore's Birthday Party. This neighborhood just tends to come across as a stuck up seclusion from the things that make Austin wonderful.
Pros
  • Some nightlife
  • Access to 183 and Hwy 1
Cons
  • Expensive
  • Generic
3/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 3/5
  • Clean & Green 3/5
  • Pest Free 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 3/5
  • Eating Out 2/5
  • Nightlife 2/5
  • Parks & Recreation 4/5
  • Shopping Options 2/5
  • Gym & Fitness 2/5
  • Internet Access 4/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Parking 4/5
  • Cost of Living 4/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Public Transport 4/5
  • Medical Facilities 3/5
Just now

"Diamond in the Rough"

In the triangle formed by Airport Blvd., Springdale Rd. and Manor Rd., the MLK neighborhood is another surviving epitome of East Side Austin. It has a former reputation of being a run down crime ridden neighborhood, but efforts have constantly been made to change that and many are jumping ship to these streets for the cheap buying and rental prices. The average house in the area goes for around $110,000 while most rental prices fall below $600. Very few apartments are in the area, but instead lines of bungalow type houses that can be irresistible to anyone who is found of such architecture and scenery.

What MLK lacks in nightlife it makes up for in neighborly spirit as this is the place to get to know and become friends with those who live next to you. Those who do want a little more excitement have plenty of bus stops and easy bike routes to use to go closer to campus or Downtown. Many mosey into this community to take advantage of the large golf course that lays along E. Martin Luther King Jr. Blvd. and there are two public parks, one with a recreation center, where residents can leisurely enjoy the outdoors. About half of those that live here live below the poverty line, but that does not seem to dampen spirits. Those who are looking for east side charm at a cheap price can easily enjoy living life in this community.
Pros
  • Cheap housing
  • Firendly Neighborhood
  • Easy access to other east side neighborhoods
Cons
  • Some poverty
  • Little nightlife
Recommended for
  • Trendy & Stylish
1/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 1/5
  • Clean & Green 1/5
  • Pest Free 2/5
  • Peace & Quiet 2/5
  • Eating Out 2/5
  • Nightlife 1/5
  • Parks & Recreation 1/5
  • Shopping Options 1/5
  • Gym & Fitness 1/5
  • Internet Access 2/5
  • Lack of Traffic 1/5
  • Parking 2/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 1/5
  • Public Transport 2/5
  • Medical Facilities 1/5
Just now

"High Traffic and Crime"

Just like Georgian Acres on he other side of the interstate, Heritage Hills offers nothing special and is like the other bland northern Austin suburban neighborhoods with the exception of high crime activity along E. Rundberg Ln. Though Austin has an overall low crime rate, it is considered unwise for anyone to walk out at night along this street. A mix of industrial warehouses and low grade apartments, the physical and social landscape of Heritage Hills is very desolate and makes one wonder how something so depressing can actually exist within the Austin city limits.

Being in direct contact to both 183 and I-35, the traffic in that feeds into the neighborhood can best be described as horrendous. This mixed with the poor and generic choices in dining and the only available shopping at the local Walmart makes this one of the least desirable communities to live in whether or not it was part of Austin. Rent is dirt cheap due to the extremely low demand among individuals to live in this area and one can only guess the quality of the properties that are listed. If a simple piece of advice were to be given, it would be to not even for a second consider living or even visiting this area of town. There are so many more neighborhoods that better celebrate the weird spirit that is Austin and at an affordable price, offering nightlife and spectacular food. You would be hard pressed to do worse in this city than you would Heritage Hills.
Pros
  • Cheap real estate
Cons
  • High crime rate
  • High traffic
  • Desolate
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 4/5
  • Clean & Green 5/5
  • Pest Free 4/5
  • Peace & Quiet 3/5
  • Eating Out 4/5
  • Nightlife 4/5
  • Parks & Recreation 4/5
  • Shopping Options 4/5
  • Gym & Fitness 4/5
  • Internet Access 5/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Parking 3/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 4/5
  • Public Transport 5/5
  • Medical Facilities 4/5
Just now

"A Slightly More Expensive Hyde Park"

Think of an upper scale Hyde Park where college graduates have spent some time growing up and are able to financially accommodate more square footage. Set between the University of Texas campus and Hyde Park, this is the perfect spot for professors or groups of students renting a space together in this beautiful green neighborhood that is just west of I-35 and east of Avenue H. The tree lined streets are perfect for morning jogs and bike rides and the numerous bus stops make traveling in and out of the area a breeze. Surrounded by Upper Boggy Creek, the campus, North University and Hyde Park, this community has easy access to all the best nightlife and restaurants while also maintaining a sense of peaceful isolation.

The Hancock Shopping Center has one of the most popular H-E-Bs in the city as well as a 24 Hour Fitness and Mission Burrito while several blocks south the Hancock Golf Course and Recreation Center. Buying a house is on the expensive side as the average price exceeds $300,000, but smaller properties can be rented and for affordable prices if split between several people. Depending on where in the neighborhood you decide to live, you may hear the occasional noise from the interstate and the University of Texas stadium, but these are usually not bothersome enough to deter renters and buyers. The easiest way to cross I-35 is by taking E. 38th 1/2 St. and Red River St. is the quickest route to campus. With constant social activity in every cardinal direction, but far away enough for some general peace and quiet, few have been disappointed with the Hancock community.
Pros
  • Green and clean
  • Social scene
  • Close to campus
Cons
  • Buying is expensive
Recommended for
  • Tourists
  • Trendy & Stylish
2/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 3/5
  • Clean & Green 2/5
  • Pest Free 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 4/5
  • Eating Out 3/5
  • Nightlife 1/5
  • Parks & Recreation 2/5
  • Shopping Options 2/5
  • Gym & Fitness 2/5
  • Internet Access 3/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Parking 4/5
  • Cost of Living 2/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 2/5
  • Public Transport 2/5
  • Medical Facilities 3/5
Just now

"Nothing Special in a Special City"

Even in its residential areas, a city like Austin is expected to have an abundance of communities that scream funk and celebrate all that is beautiful and unusual. Well, there is nothing special about Georgian Acres as you would expect with such a name. The houses and street look like any other suburbia that is out of place and out of mind. Such a low demand in this neighborhood has made the real estate cheap, but there are plenty of other place within the live music capital of the world where you can get more property bang for your buck.

One of the major downsides of Georgian Acres is the high level of crime on Rundberg Ln., but this does not turn too many heads as the overall crime rat in Austin is extremely low. The southern border of the neighborhood is Hwy 183, putting it far out of reach of the cultural and financial centers of the city, but the easy access to 183 and I-35 make commuting rather easy, yet still timely. N. Lamar has its share of restaurants and shops, but overall the social activity in Georgian Acres is severely lacking. Head a mile or two south where you can get you hands on some better property in a better location at around the same prices.
Pros
  • Cheap real estate
Cons
  • High crime rate
  • No social
  • Very far from downtown
1/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 1/5
  • Clean & Green 1/5
  • Pest Free 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 2/5
  • Eating Out 4/5
  • Nightlife 1/5
  • Parks & Recreation 1/5
  • Shopping Options 5/5
  • Gym & Fitness 4/5
  • Internet Access 3/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Parking 3/5
  • Cost of Living 1/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 2/5
  • Public Transport 2/5
  • Medical Facilities 2/5
Just now

"All Shopping"

The Gateway neighborhood is North Austin is hardly considered a community as you will not find a single house there. It is strictly a shopping and business district tucked away within the triangle formed by the intersecting Hwy 183 and Hwy 1, catering to the purchasing needs of the surrounding neighborhoods. There are no parks, but large scale gyms for individuals to obtain their daily workout routine and a large number of restaurants in the immediate area, most of which are large nationwide chains. Those who are visiting this area of the city can also stay at one of the several hotels that are set within this off the beaten path financial district.

The Gateway Shopping Center contains a Whole Foods Market and the Regal Gateway Stadium which features many movie screenings and Arboretum Crossing holds another collection of chain stores and shops. This area of town appears to resemble any other suburban shopping center as there a very few things present here that are unique to only Austin. The northern half of the Gateway neighborhood between Hwy 360 and W Baker Ln. are numerous professional buildings, many of which belong to research and information technology firms, hence it makes sense that one of the main streets is called Research Blvd. While a place to obtain your grocery and shopping needs, do not ever expect or hope to live within this highway triangle.
Pros
  • Shopping
  • Many restaurants
  • Hotels
Cons
  • No housing
  • Very far from downtown
2/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 2/5
  • Clean & Green 2/5
  • Pest Free 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 2/5
  • Eating Out 1/5
  • Nightlife 1/5
  • Parks & Recreation 1/5
  • Shopping Options 1/5
  • Gym & Fitness 1/5
  • Internet Access 3/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Parking 2/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 2/5
  • Public Transport 2/5
  • Medical Facilities 2/5
Just now

"Just Another Industrial Suburban Neighborhood"

If a cheap mortgage was the main determinant in choosing a neighborhood, then Franklin Park would be one of the top prizes. If factors such as culture, nightlife, food and shopping are added to the pool, then this southeast Austin community just does not measure up. Over half the area is filled with steel and concrete warehouse spaces that make the scenery less than visually pleasing and even the residential areas have few options for grocery shopping and the like if they want to stray away from I-35. What seems to be the only benefit of this neighborhood is the cheap real estate, with housing prices as low a $100,000, but many who relocate to Austin are willing to invest a few more bucks for the sake of being close to lively culture.

There is one public school and public park and those who need medical care have to travel to either I-35 or Hwy 71. All in all this community comes across as desolate and boring, not accurately representing the lifestyles that Austin has to offer. A fair description would be naming Franklin Park a lower scale version of the South Austin neighborhoods on the other side of the interstate. The public transportation in this neighborhood is somewhat pitiful, hence residents most often need a vehicle to travel outside these streets since it would be less than advisable for anyone to cross these sections of Hwy 71 and I-35 on bike. If you are moving to Austin and want to truly experience Austin, then avoid this neighborhood as there are plenty of other spots where you can get more bang for your buck.
Pros
  • Cheap real estate
  • Close to major highways
Cons
  • No nightlife
  • Desolate warehouse landscape
  • Boring
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 5/5
  • Clean & Green 4/5
  • Pest Free 4/5
  • Peace & Quiet 2/5
  • Eating Out 5/5
  • Nightlife 4/5
  • Parks & Recreation 2/5
  • Shopping Options 5/5
  • Gym & Fitness 4/5
  • Internet Access 5/5
  • Lack of Traffic 2/5
  • Parking 2/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 4/5
  • Public Transport 5/5
  • Medical Facilities 2/5
Just now

"Eclectic Community South of the Lake"

Between South Lamar and South Congress, Bouldin Creek contains everything unique and spits on the notion of containing remnants of large chains. Though some portions of the neighborhood have fallen victim to gentrification, most streets maintain the old time Austin charm with the majority of houses dating back to the 1940s. Catering to a younger hipster crowd, there is an abundance of coffee shops and trendy stores, though one may find the general attitudes among frequent visitors a bit much to take. S. 1st runs through the heart of the community and along with S. Congress is the main center of social and professional activity. Due to all this activity, it can be difficult to find a parking spot and your house will most likely have a stranger's car in front of it on a daily basis.

Bouldin Creek real estate is within mid range in costs for both buyers and renters. Those with a budget can easily solve the problem by renting a property with multiple roommates. The public transportation is highly efficient compared to many other areas of town and residents have easy access to the nightlife that is on S. Lamar, S. 1st and S. Congress. The lake and downtown are within walking distances and the northern end of the neighborhood is home to many artistic and cultural centers including the Long Center of Performing Arts. One of the downsides of living in Bouldin Creek, however, is how overcrowded it can get from visitors during the holidays and festivals such as Austin City Limits and South by Southwest.
Pros
  • Old charming houses
  • Access to nightlife
  • Close to the lake and Downtown
Cons
  • Can get overcrowded
  • Lack of places to park
  • Over- bearing hipster attitudes
Recommended for
  • Tourists
  • Trendy & Stylish
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 5/5
  • Clean & Green 5/5
  • Pest Free 4/5
  • Peace & Quiet 4/5
  • Eating Out 3/5
  • Nightlife 1/5
  • Parks & Recreation 5/5
  • Shopping Options 3/5
  • Gym & Fitness 2/5
  • Internet Access 4/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Parking 3/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 5/5
  • Public Transport 3/5
  • Medical Facilities 3/5
Just now

"Enjoy Everything Green"

Barton Hills has the best there is to offer in urban greenery. It is home to Zilker Park that contains Barton Springs, the Greenbelt goes through the whole length of the neighborhood and easy access to the river makes the community a dream come true for any outdoor enthusiast. There is without doubt no better place to live during the beautiful Austin spring days. Barton Springs is the perfect early evening or weekend swimming spot and Gus Fruh has the perfect stone structures for climbers. Along the length of the Greenbelt are trails that give the devotional jogger the workout he or she needs each day.

The housing prices range are within the upper $300,000s with rental prices exceeding $1,000, making this urban neighborhood a very wealthy one. Given that the parks are such a popular place for both residents and visitors, the public transportation is frequent and timely, allowing easy access to Downtown. Barton Hills also draws a crowd exceeding 70,000 during the Austin City Limits music festival, which is held every September in Zilker Park. Though the houses are within close distance to all the activity, the winding pattern of the residential streets help to create a level of isolation from too much unwanted noise, though it sometimes just cannot be avoided. Due to the area's importance in the city's tourism industry, the level of security is high and the crime rate very low.
Pros
  • Short ride to Downtown
  • Beautiful
  • Perfect place for the outdoors type
Cons
  • Expensive place to live
  • Shopping and restaurants limited
Recommended for
  • Tourists
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 4/5
  • Clean & Green 3/5
  • Pest Free 4/5
  • Peace & Quiet 3/5
  • Eating Out 4/5
  • Nightlife 4/5
  • Parks & Recreation 1/5
  • Shopping Options 5/5
  • Gym & Fitness 3/5
  • Internet Access 5/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Parking 4/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 4/5
  • Public Transport 4/5
  • Medical Facilities 3/5
Just now

"Trendy Out of the Way Community"

Though the density of the neighborhood almost qualifies it as a suburban area, do not think that the North Loop is lacking in the funk and weirdness that is Austin. The North Loop, which technically speaking is also 53rd Street, has some of the most unique spots in the city. Within a three block stretch are over half a dozen vintage shops where Austinites and visitors can shop for the most outrageous in fashion without hurting the wallet and on one of the corners is Epoch, one of Austin's 24 hour coffee shops. Another unique feature about the neighborhood is Quality Seafood, a seafood warehouse on Airport Blvd. where seasonal catches are available in bulk and include everything from tilapia to alligator.

The North Loop has many houses that are at mid-range prices for both buying and renting, with many renters paying around $850 per month. There are no parks in this neighborhood, put there is a pilates studio and martial arts studio. There are several restaurants, including Phara's Mediterranean, which is a local favorite for smoking hookah. Monkeywrench Books on E. North Loop is a collectively operated anarchist bookstore that holds regular discussions and screenings to discuss the latest issues in social justice. Though an eclectic neighborhood, the resident population is highly concentrated with higher income single individuals with many fitting the hipster stereotype. Easy access to Highway 290, Airport Blvd. and I-35 make traveling in and out of this out of the way, yet trendy community extremely easy.
Pros
  • Vintage shops
  • Unusual shops
  • 24 hour coffeehouse
Cons
  • Far from Downtown
Recommended for
  • Tourists
  • Trendy & Stylish
3/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 3/5
  • Clean & Green 3/5
  • Pest Free 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 4/5
  • Eating Out 3/5
  • Nightlife 3/5
  • Parks & Recreation 2/5
  • Shopping Options 2/5
  • Gym & Fitness 2/5
  • Internet Access 4/5
  • Lack of Traffic 4/5
  • Parking 4/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 4/5
  • Public Transport 4/5
  • Medical Facilities 2/5
Just now

"CHEAP Real Estate and Simple Living"

The Chestnut neighborhood in East Austin is named so because Chestnut Ave. runs right through the middle of it and is where to look if you want rent to be cheap, cheap, cheap. It is a small several square block area that is mainly residential houses with most of the activity kept on E. 12th Street and E. MLK. On these two main streets are some small scale eateries, that are about as down home as you can get, and Bennu Coffee, one of Austin's two 24 hour coffeehouses. Rental rates range between $250 and $615 a month and the real estate prices are cheaper than the majority of neighborhoods in the Austin area. The majority of houses have been around for several decades and maintain an old charm, but with a small amount of square footage, which for most Austinites is not an issue. This is also a preferable neighborhood for those who want to be able to ride their bike to the university or to Downtown.

Though this neighborhood has a nice backdrop and cheap rates, it is not a place for the faint of heart or those who are easily made uncomfortable. Chestnut has a high percentage of incarcerated individuals and those living below the poverty line, with some public housing located along E. MLK. While the crime rate is still very low, as it is for Austin in its entirety, those who are not used to or prefer not to live in these sort of demographics may want to avoid this neighborhood. If, however, you are in need of cheap rent and do not mind living a simpler life while being within close range of many hot spots within Austin, then Chestnut may be suitable for you. When it comes to this neighborhood, it is just a matter of personal preference.
Pros
  • Cheap real estate
  • Close to campus and downtown
  • 24 hour coffeehouse
Cons
  • Small houses
  • Residents below the poverty line
Recommended for
  • Trendy & Stylish
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